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Beliefs about personal weight


We are currently featuring the article titled “Refinement of the Beliefs About Personal Weight Survey” by Stephanie Pickett, PhD, RN; Rosalind M. Peters, PhD, RN, FAAN and Thomas Templin, PhD. You can download the article at no charge while it is featured!  Here is a message from Dr. Pickett about her work:

Dr. Stephanie Pickett

Culturally-related beliefs about personal weight are thought to contribute to behaviors leading to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among African American women. However, no tools existed that measured beliefs about personal weight among young African American women. This gap in the literature was addressed with the initial development and testing of the Beliefs about Personal Weight Survey.

In our current study we report the revisions and psychometric evaluation of the revised Beliefs about Personal Weight Survey (BPWS-2) with a sample of young African American women.  Our goal was to reduce and refine the original items to make the Survey more useful in clinical and research settings.  Psychometric evaluation of the BPWS-2 showed that the four factors from the original BPWS reemerged (Weight Acceptance, Weight Concern, Conventional Weight Regulation, Circumstantial Weight Regulation) along with a fifth factor (Excess Weight Acknowledgement). This fifth factor represents a distinction between accepting personal weight as overweight verses acknowledging personal weight as excessive.  This distinction was associated with specific eating behaviors.

The five factors (subscales) were sensitive enough to determine unique eating behaviors and psychosocial factors that influence body mass index among young African American women. Findings from this study indicate that understanding beliefs about personal weight may be a critical component in developing effective weight management strategies.

ANS Peer Review Mentoring Program


I am delighted to announce the launch of a peer review mentoring program for early-career scholars in nursing! The ANS Advisory Board has approved this plan in the interest of promoting the entry of new peer reviewers for scholarly publication in nursing, and to more fully enact our dedication to diversity and inclusion in the publishing process. We are encouraging current members of the review panel to participate in this process.  If you are an early-career scholar who is not yet involved in serving as a peer reviewer, let us know you would like to participate in this program and we will facilitate locating a mentor for you!  The full description of the program is available for download here.

To qualify as a mentee for this program, you need to meet the following criteria:

  • Completion of an earned doctoral degree, or in your candidacy anticipating final completion of the degree within the next 6 to 12 months;
  • At least one original published work as primary author that contributes to the development and application of nursing knowledge;
  • Expressed commitment to continued research, theory development, and other activities contributing to the development and application of nursing knowledge;
  • Willingness to complete reviews within approximately 3 weeks of being invited;
  • Ability and willingness to use the ANS Editorial Manager Peer Review Website;
  • Willingness to fulfill the responsibilities of the editorial review panel on a volunteer basis. (adapted from policies for serving on the ANS peer review panel)

Participating as a peer reviewer for scholarly publications is not merely a volunteer service — it is crucial to assure the credibility of published scholarship in any discipline. The main reason that this function must be voluntary is to avoid any possible appearance of conflict of interest, or vested interests influencing or controlling what appears in the literature of the discipline.  However, subtle bias can creep in to the peer review process, especially when reviewers tend to hold dominant points of view that might exclude less well known or accepted perspectives in the nursing literature.  So through this mentoring program, we hope to engage early-career scholars who have demonstrated excellence in scholarship while at the same time bringing to their work diverse perspectives that will be increasingly vital to the future of nursing.

Let us know you want to participate!

 

The Experience of Dietary Culture and Cardiovascular Disease


The current ANS featured article is titled “Dietary Culture: A Concept Analysis” by Elise A. Mollohan, MSN, RN, CNE.  In this article Mollohan defines dietary culture as patterned group eating behaviors that are unconsciously influenced and socially organized, and explains how these patterns can increase the understanding of the links between diet, culture, and cardiovascular health. For more information, download your copy of the article at no cost while it is featured! Ms. Mollohand provided this message for ANS readers:

I am intimately familiar with cardiovascular disease, as many of us are. My personal and professional experiences with the devastating effects of heart disease prompted me to make significant dietary changes several years ago.  While I have reaped immense health benefits from modifying my diet, it was not an easy transition. My experience caused me to see diet change through a different lens, becoming acutely aware of the challenges individuals face from a cultural perspective.

While working on my doctoral studies, I began exploring diet change as a strategy to promote cardiovascular health. Much of my initial research left me pondering the connection between cultural influences and diet. I found myself using the words “dietary culture” often when describing obstacles to successful diet change.  However, this concept was not clearly defined in the literature.  I also received questions from others about how our culture could be a barrier to implementing a heart-healthy diet. My need for a clear definition and a more profound understanding of the concept lead me to conduct this analysis.

The analysis process was invaluable to clarifying my understanding of dietary culture in relation to cardiovascular health. The proposed definition will be used to inform my future work, exploring the plant-based diet transition among adults with cardiovascular disease. Also, I hope that this concept analysis will promote an acknowledgment and understanding of the relationship between diet, culture, and cardiovascular health among nurses and other health care providers.

Power & Resistance in Mental Health Practice


The current featured ANS article is titled “Power and Resistance: Nursing Students’ Experiences in Mental Health Practicums” by Allie Slemon, MSN, RN; Vicky Bungay, PhD, RN; Emily Jenkins, PhD, RN and Helen Brown, PhD, RN. As the authors state, this article adds to the need for interventions that respond to everyday power imbalances in mental health care settings, and I believe, in all health care settings. The article can be downloaded at no cost while it is featured, so we invite you to read this article and return here to share your comments.  Allie Siemon shared this background about her work:

Allie Siemon

This article presents findings from my Master’s thesis work on nursing students experiences of their mental health practicums.

My clinical background is in mental health nursing, and I previously worked as a Clinical Instructor supporting students through their mandatory mental health practicum in a general nursing program. Through this experience, I observed how many students struggled with many of the particular challenges this practicum: fear of violence, worrying about being unable to make a difference, and navigating new systems such as locked doors and seclusion rooms. Yet as much as students expressed difficulty in navigating these challenges, they also demonstrated a deep commitment to their patients’ safety and well-being.

Vicky Bungay

In my Master’s degree, I began to examine the evidence on mental health practicums in nursing programs and found a small yet powerful body of literature illustrating that students in mental health practicums across many countries experience the types of challenges I had observed in my educator role. I also found that these experiences that students were having in their practicums negatively impacted students’ overall preparedness to work with individuals experiencing mental health challenges. Supporting students in navigating difficult mental health placements is a gap in our nursing education programs, and extends to gaps in mental health care delivery. To date, there have been relatively few qualitative studies that have contributed nuance and depth to our understandings of how students experience these practicums and navigate these challenges that have been illuminated largely through quantitative and survey-based research.

Emily Jenkins

I hope that this article can support nursing educators like myself in supporting students through the challenges of the mental health practicum, and can inspire nurses and nursing managers to shift practices in the mental health inpatient setting that are difficult for students and, importantly, patients. I also hope that thinking about mental health practicums as a space where resistance to power is possible can give students a new language and perspective on navigating complex environments and challenging experiences in the mental health practicum. I believe when students feel empowered and supported, they can demonstrate compassion, engagement, and commitment, and make an incredible difference in the experiences of their patients.

Helen Brown

Throughout the process of my Master’s research, I was supported by my committee: Vicky Bungay, Emily Jenkins, and Helen Brown. Each of them has contributed immeasurably to the research and to this article.

Reflective Action for Social Change


The latest featured article in ANS is titled “Cultivating Praxis Through Chinn and Kramer’s Emancipatory Knowing” authored by Jessica Peart, BSN, BA, RN and Karen MacKinnon, PhD, RN. In this article the authors explain how emancipatory knowing provides nurses a formal structure to recognize the sociopolitical factors affecting wellness, while making evident the ethical imperative and central role of taking reflective action toward social change—the praxis of nursing. The article is available for download at no cost while it is featured, and we welcome your comments and ideas!  Here is a message from Jessica Peart about this work:

What do we value as nurses?  What is important to know in order to practise safely, competently, and ethically? These questions took on a new meaning when I started my Masters of Nursing program last year as I study to become a Nurse Practitioner.

Jessica Peart

  My background—prior to my nursing career—as a community organizer laid the groundwork for seeing nursing through the lens of social justice.  The perspective, skills, and knowledge I garnered through my community work is threaded throughout my daily nursing practice.  In fact, they are integral to my “nursing toolbox” as a client and community advocate, in the critical empathy that I display supporting clients “on the margins”, and in my comfortability in the “grey” areas of our practice where nursing isn’t well represented by tick boxes or flow sheets.

But how do nurses, especially those pursuing advanced practice roles, develop competencies that forward the social justice lens that foregrounds our ethical practice when they came into their nursing role without a background in social justice work?  Following this path of inquiry in my MN coursework led me to Peggy Chinn and Maeona Kraemer’s exploration of emancipatory knowing as a means through which nurses can better understand the socio-political forces affecting our clients and take action towards more equitable social relations.  The mandate for nursing as social justice is clear, but the path we take to get there might not always be.  I found that Chinn and Kramer’s emancipatory knowing can help nurses to shed a light in the directions we might take towards cultivating the reflective practice that we have come to know as nursing praxis.

 

 

Emancipatory nursing, the environment, and anti-oppressive practice


Our featured article for the coming two weeks is titled “A Theoretical Framework for

Elisabeth Dahlborg- Lyckhage

Emancipatory Nursing With a Focus on Environment and Persons’ Own and Shared Lifeworld” by Elisabeth Dahlborg Lyckhage, PhD; Eva Brink, PhD and Berit Lindahl, PhD. In this article, the authors conceptualize “rooms” that re-focus understanding of the central phenomenon of the person’s experience of health, along with the central influence of the environment in shaping that experience (see model below). The theoretical framework leads to understanding and action in the form of anti-oppressive practice (AOP). They state: “Knowing

Eva Brink

the complexity involved in defining health is basic to understanding a person’s experiences of health. But, in contemporary nursing, definitions of health need to be complemented by more explicit critical and environmental aspects, the aim being increased equality and social justice.” (page 344).  Dr. Dahlborg-Lyckhage shared this message about their work:

Due to a growing inequity, regarding both health and received care among different groups we propose an emancipatory theoretical framework for nursing care practice. The focus on environment is a way of connecting to Nightingale’s work, although in the

Berit Lindahl

Western world of today there are other problems in the environment that affect nursing care. By using the metaphor room, we scrutinize our environment, from the philosophical level to the interactions between care seeking persons and the professionals. We hope that the paper will contribute to the existing literature on equality in nursing.

 

Featured topics coming up!


Here at ANS, we now publish “general topic” articles in most issues of the journal. These articles are consistent with the general purposes of the journal but not focused on a planned focus. But we still seek manuscripts for “featured topics” that continue our tradition of “calling forth” content that might not otherwise be addressed. Here is the plan for featured topics for the next 18 months, and a reminder of what we mean by “general topic” submissions:

General Topic Manuscripts are welcome any time ​

Manuscripts generally relevant to the purposes of the journal are welcome at any time. The purposes of ANS are to advance the development of nursing knowledge and to promote the integration of nursing philosophies, theories and research with practice. We expect high scholarly merit and encourage innovative, cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.​​

Featured topics
Critique and Innovation
Vol 42:3 –  September 2019
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2019
Consistent with the journal’s tradition, we encourage nursing scholars to reflect on work previously published in ANS, and use critical insights to present innovations in nursing theory, research, practice and policy. We encourage cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.​
Artificial Intelligence & Robotics
Vol 42:4 –  December 2019
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence and robotics have been evolving in nursing for some time. We are planning to feature articles in this issue that address the relationship of artificial intelligence and robotics to patient outcomes and quality of care from a nursing perspective. We welcome philosophic analysis, including ethical implications, empiric research reports, and the development of innovative methodologies related to artificial intelligence. Articles must focus on the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.
Nursing Theory in 2020
Vol 43:1 –  March 2020
Manuscript due date: July 15, 2019 ​
The significance of nursing perspectives has gained renewed interest as social pressures to reform healthcare have created challenges for care that is more effective, more effective and more economically sound. In both theory and in practice, nursing offers possibilities that address each of these goals.  We are inviting articles that address the state of the art of nursing theory as we approach the third decade of the 21st century, revealing important contributions that nursing brings to create needed change. ​ We welcome articles addressing the full range of theoretic development: articles that report empiric research structured from existing nursing theories, philosophic analyses related to theory and knowledge of the discipline, critiques of existing theoretical approaches, and descriptions of new and evolving nursing theories.  
Best Evidence for Nursing Practice
Vol 43:2 –  June 2020
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2019 ​
Even though the ideal of practice based on evidence has flourished over several decades, the achievement of consistently sound practice, in nursing and in other disciplines as well, still eludes even the most well-intentioned practitioners.  For this issue of ANS we seek manuscripts that explore this dilema, examing questions such as ‘what constitutes evidence?” and “what constitutes the best evidence?” We also seek manuscripts that provide exemplars of best evidence and best practices. 
Methods for Nursing Knowledge Development
Vol 43:3 –  September 2020
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2020
We seek innovative approaches to knowledge development in relation to all patterns of knowing in nursing. We also welcome manuscripts that critique any methodologic approach, manuscripts that explore the philosophic, including ethical underpinnings related to the development of nursing knowledge, and manuscripts that address the critical connections between practice and knowledge development approaches. 
Humanizing Precision Science
Vol 43:4 –  December 2020
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2020
One of the trends of our time is the development of “precision science” – a trend that deserves careful consideration going forward. We seek manuscripts for this issue that provides assessment, explanation, evaluation and critique of this trend in light of the underlying foundations of nursology. This featured topic intentionally calls for both rigor and creativity that provides avenues for discussion and possible new directions in the development of our discipline. 

Promoting Mental Health of Female Veterans


Our current featured article, which also provides 1.5 Continuing Education contact hours, is titled “Clearing Away Past Wreckage: A Constructivist Grounded Theory of Identity and Mental Health Access by Female Veterans,” authored by Lindsay Williams, PhD, MS, RN, PHN, PMP; Carol Pavlish, PhD, RN, FAAN;Sally Maliski, PhD, RN, FAAN; Donna Washington, MD, MPH. This article provides important insight to understand how women Veterans make health care–related choices and process traumatic events (such as military sexual trauma). This article is available at no cost while it is featured, and I hope you will share your thoughts about this work!  Here is a message that Dr. Williams has provided giving some background to this article:

This is a culmination of work from my dissertation that recognizes the service of women Veterans and their experiences before, during, and after their military service that ultimately lead to the use of mental health outpatient services.

Lindsay Williams

My interest in this work stemmed from my professional and personal passion to advocate for vulnerable women and amplify their voices. Women Veterans face tremendous obstacles from the pressures of military service, but I wanted to delve deeper into their lives before and after service and explore what led them to the military, and what happened to them once they left. Not being a Veteran personally, I was concerned about my placement as a researcher, and that participants would perceive as someone seeking to exploit their stories. Fortunately, I had the support of my advisors: Drs. Carol Pavlish, Sally Maliski, and Donna Washington in exploring this topic by preparing me with the tools to respectfully approach, and interview this group of women. I used Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology, as articulated by Charmaz (2014), to inform the development of the interview questionnaire with a focus on decision-making for outpatient mental health services. Using that as a starting point enabled me to maneuver backward and forward in how I approached the interview and the questions I asked.

In the course of completing this study, I was honored to interview these women and hear their powerful stories, which were undoubtedly marked by trauma throughout their lives, which became one of the major categories of my model. Another incredible part of their stories were the ways they renegotiated the place, and inherently the value, that trauma had in their lives. They were able to see the positive aspects of their service and see themselves as survivors.

I believe this study has policy and practice implications within and outside of nursing practice. As more women serve and leave the armed forces we have a responsibility to anticipate their needs, advocate for their care, and have timely, trauma-informed, gender-informed care at the ready at all points along this trajectory.

Reference:

Charmaz K. Constructing Grounded Theory. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications; 2014.

 

Emancipatory Cultural Competency in Nursing


We are delighted to introduce the current ANS featured article, titled “An Emancipatory Approach to Cultural Competency: The Application of Critical Race, Postcolonial, and Intersectionality Theories” authored by Linda M. Wesp, MSN, RN, FNP-BC; Victoria Scheer, BSN, RN; Ashley Ruiz, BSN, RN; Kimberly Walker, MSN, RN, CHPN; Jennifer Weitzel, MS, RN; Leslie Shaw, MSN, RN, ACNP-BC; Peninnah M. Kako, PhD, RN, FNP-BC; and Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, PhD, RN. In this article the authors address the critical need for approaches in nursing education, research and practice that uphold the core nursing value of commitment to social justice.  Download a copy of this article at no cost while it is featured, and share you comments and ideas about these ideas on this blog!  Here is more information about this work from the authors:

Linda M. Wesp

Emancipatory \ i-​ˈman(t)-​sə-​pə-​ˌtȯr-​ē\ (adjective): freeing from any controlling influence1

As peers pursuing a PhD in nursing at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, we have found common ground with our professors Dr. Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu and Dr. Peninnah Kako in a passion for learning about and using critical and feminist theory to shape our thinking and our work, especially intersectionality, critical race theory, and postcolonial feminisms.  The idea of this paper was originally born from several brainstorming sessions between Linda Wesp and Victoria Scheer. As we sat and talked and thought, we kept coming back to our common frustration that the theories we were finding so helpful

Victoria Scheer

and informative in our research were not being talked about in nursing or health care at all, outside of a few PhD level classes.

Early in 2018, Dr. Mkandawire-Valhmu encouraged the group of us using critical theories in our research to join forces with one another and challenged us to think about how we could take these theories and apply them.  The special ANS issue on emancipatory nursing seemed like the perfect fit for the ideas we were already tossing around about various areas of the nursing profession that would benefit from a more critical approach.  Each of us brought a specific working knowledge about the various

Ashley Ruiz

theories we used for this paper, whether intersectionality theory, critical race theory, or postcolonial feminist theory.  One of the main goals of our project was to intentionally and carefully distill the main ideas of these theories and make them understandable and applicable for nurses who may be unfamiliar with them (see Figure).

As we considered our experiences as clinicians, educators, and scholars, we decided that the way nursing approaches “cultural competency” could benefit greatly from the tenets outlined in the various critical theories.  As it is currently conceptualized, “cultural competency” in nursing (and across all health care settings) does not

Kimberly Walker

provide nurses with the tools to identify and disrupt the major structural processes and oppressive ideologies that create marginalization and inequity.  These ideologies are a controlling influence on our profession and health care as a whole. And so, we thought, what if we could outline specific ways to bring an emancipatory approach to our current understanding of cultural competency?  We began in our knowledge of the theories that seek to disrupt oppression and hegemonic thinking that create health inequities, and used this to come up with tools to equip nurses with new ways of thinking about and caring for populations that are different from them (even, and especially, for nurses who are well intentioned and think they are being “culturally competent”).

Jennifer Weitzel

Diving deeply into the theories as we prepared this paper meant we had to do our own personal work about how power and privilege works in our own lives, and think about our own approach to caring for people who are different than us. We also thought a lot about the ways that power and privilege play out in the academy and in our health care institutions, and what that means for us as nurses occupying positions that are generally considered “less powerful.”  These are not always easy realizations,

Leslie Shaw

especially for people who benefit from having more power and privilege because of the color of our skin, or our gender identity, or the country where we were born, or the letters behind our name.

We do not take lightly the magnitude of the emancipatory approach we are proposing here, and yet we feel deeply that we must continue to push for change.  We as nurses must continue to understand how power and privilege work to create and maintain difference and inequality in our

Peninnah M. Kako

world.  Continuing to approach difference in the ways we always have will mean that we completely misunderstand and erase certain populations (e.g. people of transgender experience) and/or that we continue to create unintentional and implicit bias for other populations (e.g. people who experience racialization and are therefore considered “racial or ethnic minorities” in the U.S.).

We hope that this paper is just the beginning of a larger conversation within our profession that can create much needed dialogue and change.  Also, we have so many more ideas to talk about!  We hope to spark ongoing

Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu

ideas, that might begin with questions like: Where else have nurses already been applying an emancipatory approach to cultural competency, as we suggested here, in our educational and clinical programs?  What does it look like for nurses to remain self-reflexive about our own biases?  How does implicit bias contribute to inequitable patient outcomes?  What would it look like for the nursing profession to shift from the phrase “cultural competency” to the concept of cultural safety2, which more accurately represents the emancipatory approach we suggest here?

What have you already been doing or thinking about in this area? We would love to hear from you. As the largest health profession in the U.S., we can create a slow and steady shift that leads to lasting change and health equity for all people.  Please share your thoughts, publish your experiences, and let’s keep the conversation going!

References

  1. Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Available at: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emancipate. Accessed October 31, 2018.
  2. Mkandawire-Valhmu L. Cultural Safety, Healthcare and Vulnerable Populations: A Critical Theoretical Perspective: Routledge; 2018.

 

 

Transforming Health Interviews


The first featured article in ANS Volume 41:4 discusses ways to move interviews to approaches that more clearly reflect the context and experience of health challenges.  The article is titled “Creating Emancipatory Dialogues About Identity and Health by Modernizing Interviews,” authored by Doris M. Boutain, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC; Robin Evans-Agnew, PhD, RN; Fuqin Liu, PhD, RN; and Marie-Anne S. Rosemberg, PhD, RN. The article will be available to download at no cost while it is featured, and we invite you to read it and join a discussion in this blog!  The authors sent this message about this work for ANS blog readers:

Imagine the following scenario: it is the afternoon of a school day and a health

Doris M. Boutain

researcher, the recruited youth, and parents meet for the first time. The place is a quiet corner of a public café selected by the parents who will give their consent for research participation. The researcher explains the study using consent forms previously distributed to the family to read. The parents ask a few questions and then sign the consent form. The youth also signs the assent form. Then the researcher conducts a short interview asking the youth some pre-selected, close-ended questions about demographics and establishes a follow-up meeting time. What is the value of the information collected in this encounter, and who owns this value? How does this

Robin Evans-Agnew

encounter set up the power-relations for the development of knowledge for the remainder of the research study? What did the researcher miss that might have been important concerning the identity and health of the youth.

We developed this article to share another way to design an interview. Dr. Boutain was first introduced to the need to transform the interview in her dissertation research on hypertension management with African Americans in rural South Louisiana in 1999. In her dissertation, she describes a story of how she developed her interview questions using the advice from two neighborhood groups who both instructed her to modify the interview question “How much money do you earn in a year?”, by phrasing it differently and having a different target

Fuqin Liu

of inquiry. Namely, they suggested the two questions, “Are you doing okay making your ends meet?” together with “How does making ends meet affect your blood pressure?” The neighborhood groups’ suggestions led Dr. Boutain to consider a genesis of power in the interviewer-interviewee relationship. Namely, two questions became apropos: Who decides which questions to ask in the interview?, and Which interview questions are most meaningful for research participants?. The neighborhood groups taught Dr. Boutain to ask about the relationship between identity and health, and to care about the research participants’ way of relating their identity to their health in the process of the interview. The neighborhood groups provided a public service to Dr. Boutain and created the emergence of the Identity-Research-and Health

Marie-Anne S. Rosemberg

Dialogic-Open-ended interview (I-REH-DO).

As former graduate students and current colleagues working with Dr. Boutain we identified ourselves in a participatory scholarship group called “Scholars Ready”. Drs. Evans-Agnew, Liu, and Rosemberg, applied the I-ReH-DO interview in their own research beginning in 2010. Our article is an opportunity to provide new insights into the application of the I-ReH-DO interview across diverse, and critically situated, research interests. Our work involves community-based inquiry and health interview environments similar to the scenario above. Dr. Rosemberg’s interests lie in transnationalism and immigrant worker health, including people working in hotels and nail salons. Dr. Liu conducts inquiry about global maternal child health, especially in preconception and interconception care policy in China. Dr. Evans-Agnew focuses on childhood asthma inequities, citizen science, and environmental justice with Latina and African American groups. Dr. Boutain, as the John and Marguerite Walker Corbally Professor in Public Service at the University of Washington, has deepened her interests in systems research to promote knowledge about how to sustain health equity policies and practices with community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, and public health programs and services.

As scholars ready to advance emancipatory research methodologies, we are excited to publish the use of the I-ReH-DO interview. We regard the I-ReH-DO interview as an important visioning tool for new and experienced researchers to elicit novel ways of knowing about identity and health. The I-ReH-DO interview will facilitate research encounters which advance the power of participants to define their identity and health in a way that is significant and relevant for them. Thus, we as researchers will support the emergence of emancipatory research generation. We envision that the use of the I-ReH-DO will: (1) facilitate knowledge generation from participants who define themselves for themselves; (2) extend the close-ended facet of demographic surveys to result in rich contextual data; (3) inform sustainable programs/interventions that are applicable to individuals’ identity; and (4) foster changes in structural/systemic forces that participants identify as drivers of their health.

Doris M. Boutain
Robin Evans-Agnew
Fuqin Liu
Marie-Anne S. Rosemberg

 

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