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Posts from the ‘Journal Information’ Category

Conceptual Framework of Self-Advocacy


The current ANS featured article is titled “A Conceptual Framework of Self-advocacy in Women With Cancer” authored by Teresa H. Thomas, PhD, RN; Heidi S. Donovan, PhD, RN; Margaret Q. Rosenzweig, PhD, CRNP-C, AOCNP, FAAN; Catherine M. Bender, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Yael Schenker, MD, MAS, FAAHPM. In this article the authors discuss new insights about the process of self-advocacy. Here is a message from Dr. Thomas about this work:

Teresa Thomas

The past two decades have seen increasing attention put on “patient-centered care.” Healthcare systems and providers strive to put the patient at the forefront of their services. But what about the patient? What are we asking patients to do when we attempt to be patient-centered? How are we asking them to do so? And importantly, are all patients equally able to engage in patient-centered care?

Our team’s research in patient self-advocacy strives to answer these questions in the context of women with cancer. What happens when a woman with cancer encounters a challenging situation?  How does she assert her values and priorities to ensure her needs are met? This article presents our conceptual framework of self-advocacy among women with cancer.

Through our work with women with cancer, we know that not all individuals can speak up for themselves. Individuals quickly learn that if they don’t assert themselves, their care will at best not meet with needs and at worst be mismanaged and lead to their own poor health:

    • Individuals get lost in the healthcare system because they don’t know how to question their providers or seek clarification about their health.
    • Individuals hesitate to share the side-effects of treatment with their social circles because they don’t want to be considered a burden.
    • Individuals neglect their needs for the sake of not being perceived as rude or questioning.

Two observations drive this work. First, we noticed that research in patient empowerment and self-management focused on supporting patients in performing the tasks of managing their illness. While critical, we also recognize that individuals need support in doing more than just the “tasks” of being a patient. We want to create a language and framework that recognize the individual holistically and point to ways in which they can use their strengths to address their health concerns.

Second, we noticed a lack of patient-driven solutions to addressing disparities and inequities in outcomes. While equipping patients with self-advocacy skills cannot overcome the intertwined systems that perpetuate health inequities, there are ways in which patients can actively assert themselves to address challenges in their healthcare and social support networks.

We encourage others – by engaging in our article – to explore the concepts of self-advocacy, critique and refine this framework, and ultimately develop evidence-based ways to support individuals in achieving the goals of patient-centered care.

 

 

 

 

Updated ANS Author’s Guide: Anti-racist Guidelines


The recent spotlight on police brutality and killing of Black Americans prompted widespread reflection and change toward social justice and racial inequities in almost all sectors of society – including the realm of scholarly publishing. The “Scholarly Kitchen,” blog of the Society for Scholarly Publishing, posted a notice of an “Antiracist Framework for Scholarly Publishing” on August 6, 2020 that serves as a guide to re-shape policies and practices in the production of scholarly literature.

I am delighted to share the outcome our initiative to examine and revise guidelines and practices for Advances in Nursing Science. As Editor, I established a workgroup of scholars of color who serve on the ANS Panel of Reviewers to take a deep dive into the journal’s “Information for Authors”. Together we created major anti-racist changes that have now gone into effect.

The changes that we made begin with a fundamental acknowledgement of the power of the published word to shape thought and power structures, and the responsibility of authors in situating their work within existing power structures:

Published scholarly works play a major role in shaping thought and power structures. We encourage authors to include a standpoint statement that describes your position relative to power relations of race, gender, and class. This is particularly important if your work involves disadvantaged populations or issues of social determinants of health and health equity. Examples include: 

  • “The authors Identify as white middle-class nurses. We have drawn on literature authored by scholars of color to inform the design, interpretations and conclusions reported in this article.”
  • “Our work arises from our experiences as able-bodied nurses, as well as our identities as mixed-race descendants of immigrants from Central and South American countries.”

The following is a new section that specifically addresses guidelines related to racism:

The ANS leadership – Editor, advisory board members, peer reviewers and Publisher recognize that published scholarly works are vehicles that can challenge systemic racism and intersecting forms of power inequities.  ANS expects an explicit antiracist stance as a means to provide scholarly resources to support antiracism in research, practice, education, administration, and policymaking. To this end, we offer the following guidelines:

  • Remain mindful of the many ways in which white privilege is embedded in scholarly writing, and engage in careful rereading of your work to shift away from these explicit and implied messages.  As an example, general “norms” are typically taken to reflect white experience only; this is revealed when the experience of people of color are taken to be “other” or “unusual” or worse yet “unhealthy” 
  • When race is included as a research variable or a theoretical concept, racism  must be named and integrated with other intersecting forms of oppression such as gender, sexuality, income, and religion.
  • If your work does include race,
    • Provide a rationale that clearly supports an antiracist stance.
    • Be careful not to explicitly or implicitly suggest a genetic interpretation.
    • Explicitly state the benefit that your work contributes on behalf of people of color.
  • Refrain from any content that explicitly or implicitly blames the victim or that stereotypes groups of people; situate health inequities clearly in the context of systemic processes that disadvantage people of color. 
  • Focus on unveiling dynamics that sustain harmful and discriminatory systems and beliefs, and on actions that can interrupt these structural dynamics.

Please visit the complete ANS Information for Authors to review these changes. We welcome your feedback, comments and questions! Please respond below!

Deep appreciation to the following team of ANS peer reviewers who developed these guidelines:

Helene Berman, RN, Ph.D, University of Western Ontario

Mary K. Canales, Ph.D., RN, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, PhD, RN (also member of Nursology.net management team)

Margaret Dexheimer Pharris, RN, PhD, FAAN, St. Catherine University (Emerita)

Bukola Oladunni Salami, RN, MN, PhD, University of Alberta

Holly Wei, PhD, RN, CPN, NEA-BC, East Caroline University

Jennifer Woo, Ph.D., CNM, WHNP, FACNM, Texas Woman’s University (also member of Nursology.net management team)

Collaboration – DNP and PhD


Our current featured article is titled “Constructing Doctoral Leadership Scholarly Role Boundaries Through Intraprofessional Nursing Education,” available for download while it is featured. The authors are Peggy Jenkins, PhD, RN; Jacqueline Jones, PhD, RN, FAAN; Alexis Koutlas, MSN, RN, NE-BC; Suzanne Courtwright, MSN, RN, PNP; Jessica Davis, FNP, AOCNP, ACHPN and Lisa Liggett, RN, MSN, CCRN. In this video, Dr. Jenkins is joined by three of her co-authors who recently completed their DNP programs, to discuss the value of DNP and PhD collaboration.

Peggy Jenkins
Jessica Davis
Alexis Koutlas
Lisa Liggett

Innovative Indigenous Research Methodology


The latest ANS featured article is titled “Symbiotic Allegory as Innovative Indigenous Research Methodology” by Barbara Charbonneau-Dahlen, PhD.  In this article Dr. Dahlen draws on her research focus describing the  experiences of Native American boarding school survivors who were victims and witnesses of abuse, with particular attention to the sustained impact of historical trauma. She provided this message for ANS readers about her background and her research focus:

Barbara Dahlen

I was born and raised in Olga, North Dakota and completed most of my childhood education in a mission boarding school in South Dakota and higher education in North Dakota. I am an enrolled member of the Pembina band of Indians. I earned my doctorate from Florida Atlantic University Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing located in Boca Raton, FL. In recognition of the scant literature that existed on the history of Native American nurses in the United States, I began a long journey of discovery in collecting data on historical trauma.  I came to focus on symbiotic allegory because I  wanted to tell  the indigenous stories in the participants own voices to allow the voice to be heard.  This methodology came with a desire to honor the story that was given to my through honoring the sacred tradition of story at the heart of the research.

Epistemic Injustice in Women’s Reproductive Healthcare


The latest ANS featured article is titled “Epistemic Injustice A Philosophical Analysis of Women’s Reproductive Health Care in a Somali-American Community”  authored by Robin Narruhn, PhD, MN, RN and Terri Clark, PhD, CNM, ARNP, RN, FACNM.  Visit the ANS website to download this article; we welcome your comments and responses to this work.  Here is a slideshow narrated by Dr. Narruhn that gives some background on this work:

Planned ANS featured topics!


As we approach the year 2020, we invite ANS readers and nursing scholars everywhere to take a look at the topics we are featuring in the next couple of years. Even though we no longer dedicate entire issues to a topic, we continue to call for articles related to topics that we believe have particular significance for nursing and healthcare.  Here is the lineup:

Methods for Nursing Knowledge Development
Vol 43:3 –  September 2020
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2020
Vol 43:3
We seek innovative approaches to knowledge development in relation to all patterns of knowing in nursing. We also welcome manuscripts that critique any methodologic approach, manuscripts that explore the philosophic, including ethical underpinnings related to the development of nursing knowledge, and manuscripts that address the critical connections between practice and knowledge development approaches.
Humanizing Precision Science
Vol 43:4 –  December 2020
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2020
Vol 43:3
One of the trends of our time is the development of “precision science” – a trend that deserves careful consideration going forward. We seek manuscripts for this issue that provides assessment, explanation, evaluation and critique of this trend in light of the underlying foundations of nursology. This featured topic intentionally calls for both rigor and creativity that provides avenues for discussion and possible new directions in the development of our discipline.
Social Influences on Health
Vol 44:1 –  March 2021
Manuscript due date: July 15, 2020
Awareness of social influences on health (often called social determinants of health) has grown in recent decades as social, political and environmental challenges have increasingly threatened the health and all it inhabitants.  For this issue we invite articles addressing specific nursing approaches related to these issues, and advances in nursing knowledge that forms a foundation for nursing’s contributions to this important area of focus.
Historical Trauma & Health
Vol 44:2 –  June 2021
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2020
Nursing has a long history of practice and scholarship related to the care of people who experience trauma of all types. However, the health effects of historical trauma only recently have begun to be conceptualized and understood as a significant determinant of health.  For this issue of ANS, we invite scholarship that addresses this important connection and provides a clear perspective founded on nursing’s fundamental values. We welcome research reports, philosophic, including ethics analysis, and exploration of theory and evidence guided practice.
Social Justice, Big Data & Health Disparities
Vol 44:3 –  September 2021
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2021
We are seeking articles that provide a social jusice lens to the emerging ways in which big data are being used , and how these approaches can inform nursing approaches to addressing health disparities. We seek in particular articles that report research, practice, education and policy informed by nursing theoretical and philosophic perspectives.
Values and Vicissitudes of Nursing Scholarship
Vol 44:4 – December 2021
Manuscript due date – April 15, 2021
The evolution of scholarship as online publishing emerged in the past 15 years now points to an urgency to be crystal clear about the standards that shape the scholarship of our discipline, affirm these standards as collective values, and that serve as guideposts for the evolution of scholarship in the future.  For this issue of ANS we welcome manuscripts that explore the values and vicissitudes on which our standards are built.  Articles can address specific areas of focus, or more broadly on underlying philosophic concerns.

General Manuscripts are welcome any time ​

Manuscripts generally relevant to the purposes of the journal are welcome at any time. The purposes of ANS are to advance the development of nursing knowledge and to promote the integration of nursing philosophies, theories and research with practice. We expect high scholarly merit and encourage innovative, cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.​​

Planned ANS featured topics!


As ANS readers have noticed, we no longer devote entire issues to a specific topic, but we do announce topics to feature in each issue.  This provides a good balance between our tradition of calling forth scholarship on timely issues in nursing and health care, and an open door for the wide range of topics that nurse scholars are exploring.  Here are the topics we have planned for the next 6 issues:

Best Evidence for Nursing Practice
Vol 43:2 –  June 2020
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2019 ​
Vol 43:2
Even though the ideal of practice based on evidence has flourished over several decades, the achievement of consistently sound practice, in nursing and in other disciplines as well, still eludes even the most well-intentioned practitioners.  For this issue of ANS we seek manuscripts that explore this dilema, examing questions such as ‘what constitutes evidence?” and “what constitutes the best evidence?” We also seek manuscripts that provide exemplars of best evidence and best practices. 

Methods for Nursing Knowledge Development
Vol 43:3 –  September 2020
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2020
Vol 43:3
We seek innovative approaches to knowledge development in relation to all patterns of knowing in nursing. We also welcome manuscripts that critique any methodologic approach, manuscripts that explore the philosophic, including ethical underpinnings related to the development of nursing knowledge, and manuscripts that address the critical connections between practice and knowledge development approaches.
Humanizing Precision Science
Vol 43:4 –  December 2020
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2020
Vol 43:3
One of the trends of our time is the development of “precision science” – a trend that deserves careful consideration going forward. We seek manuscripts for this issue that provides assessment, explanation, evaluation and critique of this trend in light of the underlying foundations of nursology. This featured topic intentionally calls for both rigor and creativity that provides avenues for discussion and possible new directions in the development of our discipline.
Social Influences on Health
Vol 44:1 –  March 2021
Manuscript due date: July 15, 2020
Awareness of social influences on health (often called social determinants of health) has grown in recent decades as social, political and environmental challenges have increasingly threatened the health and all it inhabitants.  For this issue we invite articles addressing specific nursing approaches related to these issues, and advances in nursing knowledge that forms a foundation for nursing’s contributions to this important area of focus.
Historical Trauma & Health
Vol 44:2 –  June 2021
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2020
Nursing has a long history of practice and scholarship related to the care of people who experience trauma of all types. However, the health effects of historical trauma only recently have begun to be conceptualized and understood as a significant determinant of health.  For this issue of ANS, we invite scholarship that addresses this important connection and provides a clear perspective founded on nursing’s fundamental values. We welcome research reports, philosophic, including ethics analysis, and exploration of theory and evidence guided practice.

Reconceptualizing the Electronic Health Record for a new decade: A Caring Technology?


Our first featured article in ANS 42:3 is titled “Reconceptualizing the Electronic Health Record for a New Decade: A Caring Technology?” authored by Catherine Robichaux, PhD, RN; Mari Tietze, PhD, RN-BC, FHIMSS; Felicia Stokes, JD,MA, RN; and Susan McBride, PhD, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FAAN. This article examines and critiques a 2009 article published exactly 10 years ago in ANS that focused on the electronic health record and propose a virtue ethics framework for the future (see Dilemmas, Tetralemmas, Reimagining the Electronic Health Record). It is available for free download while it is featured, and we welcome your comments related to this important topic!  Here is a message from Dr. Robichaux about this work:

L to R – Felicia (Liz) Stokes, Mari Tietze, Catherine Robichaux

We are very happy to have this article published in the Critique and Innovation issue of ANS. This is our second collaborative publication and we each bring different experiences and perspectives to the complicated issues inherent in the development and use of the electronic health record (EHR). Susan and Mari are nurse informaticists, researchers and educators, Catherine’s background is ethics and education, and Liz (Felicia) is a nurse ethicist, policy expert and attorney. As with our first article, this manuscript evolved from Susan and Mari’s research exploring nurses’ experiences with the EHR in which the participants described a wide range of advantages and disadvantages.  Recognizing that it had been ten years since passage of the HITECH act in 2009, we were interested in whether some of the problems

Susan McBride

described in their research were identified ten years ago. Through our literature review, we discovered the article by Petrovskaya, McIntyre, and McDonald, Dilemmas, tetralemmas, reimagining the electronic health record.  This article beautifully analyzes advanced technologies with the ethical and philosophical constructs of caring in nursing.  Rather than viewing the use of technology and caring practice as an either/or dilemma, they suggested application of the tetralemma, a Buddhist approach which expands the range of choices.

Although positive aspects of the EHR have been realized since 2009, many problems identified by Petrovskya et al. continue. We discuss these ongoing challenges to patient safety and nursing practice and suggest integration of polarity thinking with the tetralemma as a viable approach to resolution.  Petrovskya et al. also addressed the potential negative impact of the EHR on ethical nursing practice and we explore the relevance of virtue ethics and technomoral wisdom in revisioning the EHR as a caring technology.

We believe that the roles of nursing leadership, education, research and organizational accountability are all critical in addressing the issues identified in this article.  We hope this discussion is helpful to readers and we look forward to your comments.

 

 

New! ANS Vol 42 No 3 is now available!


This new issue of ANS features a number of articles that carry ou the tradition of articles that build on past content published in ANS – known as “Critique and Innovation” (also called replication in the past).  Browse the titles of all of the articles in this issue here and watch this blog for more information featuring each of the articles as they become available to download at no cost!

This issue opens with a commentary titled “Peer-Review Mentorship: What It Is and Why We Need It” by Kristen R. Haase, PhD, RN; Laura Dzurec, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, ANEF, FAAN.  Dr. Dzurec, who has served on the ANS review panel for many years, and Dr. Haase, who is early in her academic career,  worked together in to explore in depth the nature of peer review and how it is conducted for papers submitted to be considered for publication in ANS.  The plan we have for mentoring is proving to be highly successful, with mentees moving on to become peer reviewers for either ANS, or for other nursing journals.  If you are interested in participating in this program, take a look at the description of this plan (also accessed from a link in the sidebar of this blog) and let me know of your interest!

Resisting Racism in Nursing


The current featured article in ANS offers critical insight into the dynamics of racism in nursing using narrative analysis. The article is by Nancy Clark, PhD, RN and Nasrin Saleh, RN, MPH, titled “Applying Critical Race Feminism and Intersectionality to Narrative Inquiry A Point of Resistance for Muslim Nurses Donning a Hijab”.  We invite you to download this article while it is featured, and share your comments and insights related to this important issue.  Here is a message sent by the authors for ANS readers:

Nancy Clark

Our article is based on the doctoral work of the second author who is a practicing Muslim nurse wearing a hijab. The article begins with a powerful quote by Nasrin Saleh stemming from her daily experiences and an encounter with one of her patients who accused her of being a terrorist based on her hijab. The article proposes a methodological approach that employs narrative inquiry framed within critical race feminism and the lens of intersectionality as a point of resistance for Muslim nurses donning to stand against their racialization.

We are very pleased to have our article published in ANS and in this special issue. Our article is timely and powerful, considering the dramatic and recent rise of islamophobia in the US, Canada, Europe and globally, and the current political climate, the heightened attention placed on Muslims by the media, the hypervisibility of Muslim women and nurses donning hijab, and the lack of knowledge on the experiences of Muslim nurses donning a hijab. Therefore, in our view, a main contribution of the article is in advocating for a collective antiracist social action in nursing by proposing a methodological approach to bring the voices of Muslim nurses donning hijab to the collective discourse

Nasrin Saleh

on racism in nursing, and to recognize and speak against the racialization of Muslim women/nurses. The article introduces religion as an axis of difference and the need for examining its intersections with gender and race in shaping the experiences of Muslim nurses donning hijab. This article is also a step forward in speaking against racism in nursing and to advance social justice.  

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