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Posts from the ‘Journal Information’ Category

Distant Reiki Intervention During the COVID-19 Pandemic


The current ANS featured article is titled “Experiences With a Distant Reiki Intervention During the
COVID-19 Pandemic Using the Science of Unitary Human Beings Framework
” authored by Jennifer DiBenedetto, PhD, RN-BC. You can download this article at no cost while it is featured on the ANS website! Here is a message from the author about her research:

One of my research interests centers on mind-body therapies and its integration into conventional medicine to offer non-pharmacologic interventions to manage psychological and emotional distress in the community. A mind-body therapy I am especially interested in researching is Reiki therapy. Reiki therapy is a holistic healing modality that facilitates an exchange of life force energy to promote wellness in its recipient. As a Reiki Master and Registered Nurse, I enjoy integrating Reiki therapy into both my nursing practice and to clients in my local community.

When this study was designed and conducted, I was employed as a critical care nurse during the COVID-19 pandemic. I witnessed the way nurses cared for patients with COVID-19 and the effect it had on the emotional and mental health of patients, nurses, and the community. With stress and anxiety being especially high, along with my personal passion of engaging in self-care and practicing Reiki, it sparked my desire to research distant Reiki and its impact on perceived stress and anxiety using Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings Framework. Distant Reiki was selected for this article due to its ability to offer healing in a socially distant way within the human-environmental field pattern.

This article stretches the lens of what is traditionally published in studies employing Rogers’ framework, particularly in its mixed method design and the interpretation of the qualitative and quantitative results. There is also novelty in the reconceptualization of the terms “stress” and “anxiety” by noting these patterns as perceptions of stress and anxiety. Further emphasis is given on the intentional presence of the nurse who is delivering the distant Reiki and how the openness allowed for the nurse and participant to engage in a mutual and dynamic process of generating new patterns. This pattern change is achieved through the promotion of participant awareness, self-reflection, self-discovery, and human choice. Verbal accounts from the participants, along with the instrument scores, support a transformative experience in fostering mental wellness, wellbecoming, and self-care. Future research into how nurses can use healing modalities into their practice, such as Reiki, to foster the nurse-patient relationship is needed.

COP27 Climate Change Conference: Urgent action needed for Africa and the world


This Commentary is being published simultaneously in multiple journals.
See the full list of journals here.  

Wealthy nations must step up support for Africa and vulnerable countries in addressing past, present and future impacts of climate change

The 2022 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) paints a dark picture of the future of life on earth, characterised by ecosystem collapse, species extinction, and climate hazards such as heatwaves and floods (1). These are all linked to physical and mental health problems, with direct and indirect consequences of increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these catastrophic health effects across all regions of the globe, there is broad agreement—as 231 health journals argued together in 2021—that the rise in global temperature must be limited to less than 1.5oC compared with pre-industrial levels.

While the Paris Agreement of 2015 outlines a global action framework that incorporates providing climate finance to developing countries, this support has yet to materialise (2). COP27 is the fifth Conference of the Parties (COP) to be organised in Africa since its inception in 1995. Ahead of this meeting, we—as health journal editors from across the continent—call for urgent action to ensure it is the COP that finally delivers climate justice for Africa and vulnerable countries. This is essential not just for the health of those countries, but for the health of the whole world.

Africa has suffered disproportionately although it has done little to cause the crisis

The climate crisis has had an impact on the environmental and social determinants of health across Africa, leading to devastating health effects (3). Impacts on health can result directly from environmental shocks and indirectly through socially mediated effects (4). Climate change-related risks in Africa include flooding, drought, heatwaves, reduced food production, and reduced labour productivity (5). 

Droughts in sub-Saharan Africa have tripled between 1970-79 and 2010-2019 (6). In 2018, devastating cyclones impacted three million people in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe (6). In west and central Africa, severe flooding resulted in mortality and forced migration from loss of shelter, cultivated land, and livestock (7). Changes in vector ecology brought about by floods and damage to environmental hygiene have led to increases in diseases across sub-Saharan Africa, with rises in malaria, dengue fever, Lassa fever, Rift Valley fever, Lyme disease, Ebola virus, West Nile virus and other infections (8, 9). Rising sea levels reduce water quality, leading to water-borne diseases, including diarrhoeal diseases, a leading cause of mortality in Africa (8). Extreme weather damages water and food supply, increasing food insecurity and malnutrition, which causes 1.7 million deaths annually in Africa (10). According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, malnutrition has increased by almost 50% since 2012, owing to the central role agriculture plays in African economies (11). Environmental shocks and their knock-on effects also cause severe harm to mental health (12). In all, it is estimated that the climate crisis has destroyed a fifth of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the countries most vulnerable to climate shocks (13). 

The damage to Africa should be of supreme concern to all nations. This is partly for moral reasons. It is highly unjust that the most impacted nations have contributed the least to global cumulative emissions, which are driving the climate crisis and its increasingly severe effects. North America and Europe have contributed 62% of carbon dioxide emissions since the Industrial Revolution, whereas Africa has contributed only 3% (14). 

The fight against the climate crisis needs all hands on deck

Yet it is not just for moral reasons that all nations should be concerned for Africa. The acute and chronic impacts of the climate crisis create problems like poverty, infectious disease, forced migration, and conflict that spread through globalised systems (6, 15). These knock-on impacts affect all nations. COVID-19 served as a wake-up call to these global dynamics and it is no coincidence that health professionals have been active in identifying and responding to the consequences of growing systemic risks to health. But the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic should not be limited to pandemic risk (16, 17). Instead, it is imperative that the suffering of frontline nations, including those in Africa, be the core consideration at COP27: in an interconnected world, leaving countries to the mercy of environmental shocks creates instability that has severe consequences for all nations. 

The primary focus of climate summits remains to rapidly reduce emissions so that global temperature rises are kept to below 1.5 °C. This will limit the harm. But, for Africa and other vulnerable regions, this harm is already severe. Achieving the promised target of providing $100bn of climate finance a year is now globally critical if we are to forestall the systemic risks of leaving societies in crisis. This can be done by ensuring these resources focus on increasing resilience to the existing and inevitable future impacts of the climate crisis, as well as on supporting vulnerable nations to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions: a parity of esteem between adaptation and mitigation. These resources should come through grants not loans, and be urgently scaled up before the current review period of 2025. They must put health system resilience at the forefront, as the compounding crises caused by the climate crisis often manifest in acute health problems. Financing adaptation will be more cost-effective than relying on disaster relief.

Some progress has been made on adaptation in Africa and around the world, including early warning systems and infrastructure to defend against extremes. But frontline nations are not compensated for impacts from a crisis they did not cause. This is not only unfair, but also drives the spiral of global destabilisation, as nations pour money into responding to disasters, but can no longer afford to pay for greater resilience or to reduce the root problem through emissions reductions. A financing facility for loss and damage must now be introduced, providing additional resources beyond those given for mitigation and adaptation. This must go beyond the failures of COP26 where the suggestion of such a facility was downgraded to “a dialogue” (18). 

The climate crisis is a product of global inaction, and comes at great cost not only to disproportionately impacted African countries, but to the whole world. Africa is united with other frontline regions in urging wealthy nations to finally step up, if for no other reason than that the crises in Africa will sooner rather than later spread and engulf all corners of the globe, by which time it may be too late to effectively respond. If so far they have failed to be persuaded by moral arguments, then hopefully their self-interest will now prevail.

Lukoye Atwoli, Editor-in-Chief, East African Medical Journal; Gregory E. Erhabor, Editor-in-Chief, West African Journal of Medicine; Aiah A. Gbakima, Editor-in-Chief, Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research; Abraham Haileamlak, Editor-in-Chief, Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences; Jean-Marie Kayembe Ntumba, Chief Editor, Annales Africaines de Medecine ; James Kigera, Editor-in-Chief, Annals of African Surgery; Laurie Laybourn-Langton, University of Exeter; Bob Mash, Editor-in-Chief, African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine; Joy Muhia, London School of Medicine and Tropical Hygiene; Fhumulani Mavis Mulaudzi, Editor-in-Chief, Curationis; David Ofori-Adjei, Editor-in-Chief, Ghana Medical Journal; Friday Okonofua, Editor-in-Chief, African Journal of Reproductive Health; Arash Rashidian, Executive Editor, and Maha El-Adawy, Director of Health Promotion, Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal; Siaka Sidibé, Director of Publication, Mali Médical; Abdelmadjid Snouber, Managing Editor, Journal de la Faculté de Médecine d’Oran; James Tumwine, Editor-in-Chief, African Health Sciences; Mohammad Sahar Yassien, Editor-in-Chief, Evidence-Based Nursing Research; Paul Yonga, Managing Editor, East African Medical Journal; Lilia Zakhama, Editor-in-Chief, La Tunisie Médicale; Chris Zielinski, University of Winchester.

Correspondence: chris.zielinski@ukhealthalliance.org

References

  1. IPCC. Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Working Group II Contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report; 2022.
  2. UN. The Paris Agreement: United Nations; 2022 [Available from: https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/paris-agreement (accessed 12/9/2022)].
  3. Climate change and Health in Sub-saharan Africa: The Case of Uganda. Climate Investment Funds; 2020.
  4. WHO. Strengthening Health Resilience to Climate Change 2016.
  5. Trisos CH, I.O. Adelekan, E. Totin, A. Ayanlade, J. Efitre, A. Gemeda, et al. Africa. In: Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. 2022 [Available from: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg2/  (accessed 26/9/2022)].
  6. Climate Change Adaptation and Economic Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa. World Bank; 2021.
  7. Opoku SK, Leal Filho W, Hubert F, Adejumo O. Climate Change and Health Preparedness in Africa: Analysing Trends in Six African Countries. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(9):4672.
  8. Evans M, Munslow B. Climate change, health, and conflict in Africa’s arc of instability. Perspectives in Public Health. 2021;141(6):338-41.
  9. S. P. Stawicki, T. J. Papadimos, S. C. Galwankar, A. C. Miller, Firstenberg MS. Reflections on Climate Change and Public Health in Africa in an Era of Global Pandemic.  Contemporary Developments and Perspectives in International Health Security. 2: Intechopen; 2021.
  10. Climate change and Health in Africa: Issues and Options: African Climate Policy Centre 2013 [Available from: https://archive.uneca.org/sites/default/files/PublicationFiles/policy_brief_12_climate_change_and_health_in_africa_issues_and_options.pdf (accessed 12/9/2022)].
  11. Climate change is an increasing threat to Africa2020. Available from: https://unfccc.int/news/climate-change-is-an-increasing-threat-to-africa (accessed 12/9/2022).
  12. Atwoli L, Muhia J, Merali Z. Mental health and climate change in Africa. BJPsych International. 2022:1-4 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjpsych-international/article/mental-health-and-climate-change-in-africa/65A414598BA1D620F4208A9177EED94B (accessed 26/9/22022).
  13. Climate Vulnerable Economies Loss report. Switzerland: Vulnerable twenty group; 2020.
  14. Ritchie H. Who has contributed most to global CO2 emissions? Our World in Data. https://ourworldindata.org/contributed-most-global-co2 (accessed 12/9/2022).
  15. Bilotta N, Botti F. Paving the Way for Greener Central Banks. Current Trends and Future Developments around the Globe. Rome: Edizioni Nuova Cultura for Istituto Affari Internazionali (IAI); 2022.
  16. WHO. COP26 special report on climate change and health: the health argument for climate action. . Geneva: World Health Organization; 2021.
  17. Al-Mandhari A; Al-Yousfi A; Malkawi M; El-Adawy M. “Our planet, our health”: saving lives, promoting health and attaining well-being by protecting the planet – the Eastern Mediterranean perspectives. East Mediterr Health J. 2022;28(4):247−248. https://doi.org/10.26719/2022.28.4.247 (accessed 26/9/2022)
  18. Simon Evans, Josh Gabbatiss, Robert McSweeney, Aruna Chandrasekhar, Ayesha Tandon, Giuliana Viglione, et al. COP26: Key outcomes agreed at the UN climate talks in Glasgow. Carbon Brief [Internet]. 2021. Available from: https://www.carbonbrief.org/cop26-key-outcomes-agreed-at-the-un-climate-talks-in-glasgow/ (accessed 12/9/2022).

Social Media Use by Nursing Journals


The current ANS featured article is titled “An Exploratory Study of Social Media Use and Management by
Nursing Journals
” authored by Jayne Jennings Dunlap, DNP, FNP-C; and Julee Waldrop, DNP, PNP, FAANP, FAAN. We invite you to download the article at no cost while it is featured, and share your comments here. Dr. Dunlap sent this message about this work for ANS readers:

Jayne Jennings Dunlap

I am the Director of Social Media at the Journal for Nurse Practitioners and my co-author Julee Waldrop is the Editor-in-Chief. Social media posting and presence take time and resources. As we considered expanding our journal’s social media platforms, we wondered what other nursing journals were doing. In searching the literature, we discovered that medical journals have looked at the concept of social media editors for some time but to date there has been no nursing specific literature on this topic. This knowledge motivated Julee and I to explore the use and management of social media at nursing journals.

Nurses as leaders and patient advocates may be interested in how peer-reviewed nursing journals are currently using social media and the role of the social media editor.  We believe this is an evolving and important area for investigation and Julee and I hope to continue tracking more information as we begin to understand social media impacts which may transcend the discipline. Nurses should lead, always. And this is an area ripe for future research. 

Exploring the Accuracy of Cited References


The current featured ANS article is titled “Exploring the Accuracy of Cited References in a Selected Data Set of Nursing Journal Articles” authored by Leslie H. Nicoll, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN; Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN; Heather Carter-Templeton, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN; Jordan Wrigley, MSLS, MA; and Jacqueline K. Owens, PhD, RN, CNE. Head on over to the ANS website and download this article while it is featured and share your comments here. Dr. Nicoll shared this message about this project:

Leslie H. Nicoll

I heard Karin Kirchhoff speak at a conference almost 40 years ago on the topic of accuracy of reference in nursing journals. This topic has been on my mind ever since and I have always used her original research as a benchmark for accuracy. Our study shows that accuracy has improved dramatically over the past four decades. We found low error rates overall and only 1.3% of references (8 out of 666) could not be retrieved at all. I attribute much of this change to electronic resources for searching, retrieval, and reference management, at both the local and global level. This is a very positive finding.

One thing that struck me, as I sorted through and carefully looked at actual citations, is how little the format has changed, even though the type and location of sources has changed dramatically. APA style was first introduced in 1929 and at that time they asked for the author name(s), article title, journal title, year, volume, and page numbers. At that time, those guidelines probably sufficed for the vast majority of citations, except for maybe the occasional dissertation or reference to a legal citation. Now, almost 100 years later we are basically using the same format, with the addition of the DOI. However, how and where we retrieve information is vastly different. Print journals are no longer the norm; in fact, it is probably safe to say that journal articles are no longer the primary source for information. They share the stage with reports, white papers, policy briefs, legislative documents, blogs, dissertations, fugitive literature and more. Does this 100 year old APA format really work to provide accurate and concise information to retrieve a citation anymore? Maybe it is time to rethink what exactly needs to be included in a citation and make it as streamlined and versatile as possible. Scholars, authors, and students need to be able to move beyond styling references as part of their authorial activity. It’s tedious and time consuming and at this point, provides very little added value. Time to call for a reference citation revolution!

Creation of Care through Communication


The current ANS featured article is titled “Creation of Care Through Communication by Nurses, Welfare Workers, and Persons (Children) With Profound Intellectual Multiple Disabilities at a Day Care Center: Emancipation From the Japanese ‘Shame Culture‘” authored by Tomoni Sato, PhD, RN. Visit the ANS website to download the article at no charge! Here is a message from Dr. Sato about her work:

Persons with PIMD have difficulty communicating both verbally and nonverbally, and are susceptible to life-threatening situations. Therefore, these individuals have high medical dependency and require concentrated care. However, the uniquely Japanese tradition of “shame culture” constrains the lives and behaviors of persons with PIMD and their families.

Tomoni Sato

Japan has a long cultural background of “shame culture” and thus Japanese parents have typically been more reluctant to let children with disabilities out in public. Japanese people place great value on obligations and repaying favors, and “shame” is an emotion that is evoked when one is unable to meet an obligation or return a favor. Japan also used to have a “family reign system,” in which a male succeeded the family genealogy, so the birth of a male child has traditionally been desired.

The family reign system was abolished in 1947, but the belief that the birth of a child with a disability disgraces the family has persisted. Against this backdrop of “shame culture” and the resultant tendency toward prejudice and discrimination, an increase was seen in the number of cases in which Japanese families refused to take their children with PIMD home from the hospital or infant care home. As a countermeasure, a policy was implemented to place children with PIMD in a facility for protection and ryoiku (treatment, childcare, and education). As a result, participation in society by persons with PIMD in Japan was delayed and has only been considered since the beginning of the 21st century. In 2010, the Japanese government created a system that aimed to support independence based on the principle of normalization, stipulated participation by persons with PIMD in social activities as equal members of society through self-selection and selfdetermination, and proceeded to introduce necessary laws.

In this study, care that emancipates persons with PIMD and their families from Japanese “shame culture” was identified using ethnographic research methods. Nurses and welfare staff at a day care facility provided coordinated care to address the medical needs of persons with PIMD and to promote their self-expression and autonomy. This result should be of interest to a broad readership, particularly researchers and practitioners in the field of palliative care. This research provides insight into ways to support persons with PIMD and their families to emancipate them from Japanese “shame culture” and enable their autonomy. 

Early Detection of Patient Deterioration


The featured ANS article for the next two weeks is titled “Patient Deterioration on General Care Units: A Concept Analysis” authored by Mary Rose Gaughan, MS, RN, CNE and Carla R. Jungquist, PhD, ANP-BC, FAAN, both at the School of Nursing, University at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo). While this article is featured, please visit the ANS website where you can download it at no cost, and we welcome you to add your comments here about this work. Here is a message from Mary Rose Gaughan about this work:

Mary Rose Gaughan

I have been a practicing critical care and emergency room nurse in upstate New York for many years. During my time at the bedside, I have directly observed patients exhibit specific cues that alert the nurse that deterioration is occurring. This concept is difficult to teach by textbook and requires direct observation to understand the phenomena. My future research will involve interviewing expert nurses to clarify these cues that hallmark patient deterioration.

Call for ANS Editor


The time has arrived for me to “retire” from my role as Editor of ANS, and to engage a nurse scholar to assume this role starting in January 2023! The Call for ANS Editor is now posted ! Download PDF.

Embracing Difference Between Theoretical and Practical Knowledge


The current featured article in ANS is titled “Learning in the Third Room—A Way to Develop Praxis by Embracing Differences Between Theoretical and Practical Knowledge” authored by Elisabeth Dahlborg, PhD. You can access the article at no charge while it is featured, and we would be delighted to know your comments and ideas about this article in the comments below! Here is the abstract for the article:

Contradictions between theory and practice are well known in nursing. To this end, this article discusses a learning strategy that might facilitate the capture of the dialectic between theory and practice, equally valid components of a nurse’s competence, giving the 2 forms of knowledge equal relevance. Using a virtual platform (ie, the “third room”) decreases the power order between different forms of knowledge. Nurses, students, and teachers all contribute to a seminar using nonhierarchical structures and concepts to capture the knowledge that enables to learn the praxis of nursing. Key words: discourses, nursing education, philosophy, power order, virtual seminar, work integrated learning.

Source

Black Women’s Strength in Living with Chronic Pain


The current featured article for ANS is titled “’Be Strong My Sista’ – Sentiments of Strength From Black Women With Chronic Pain Living in the Deep South” authored by Lakeshia Cousin, PhD, APRN, AGPCNP-BC; Versie Johnson-Mallard, PhD, WHNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN; and Staja Q. Booker, PhD, RN. We welcome you to download this article at no cost while it is featured, and share your comments below in the ‘comments’ section. Here is a message that co-author Staja Booker shared about this work:

After meeting a Black woman on vacation who voluntarily shared her raw experience of living chronic
pain, it was clear that this conversation was a true representation of how many Black women feel living
with chronic pain. But more importantly, we were convinced that the story of aging Black women with
chronic pain had to be shared, but from a perspective that could (1) adequately explain the cultural
context of coping because of the gendered racial socialization that plagues us throughout our lives and
(2) realistically educate healthcare providers about Black women’s nuanced experience of living with
pain and seeking pain care in an unjust healthcare system.

The traditional connotation and expectations of “strength” have been associated with women who identify as Black for many decades. The Strong Black Woman (and its corollary The Superwoman Schema) is a unique cultural phenomenon with both paradoxically endearing positive and enduring negative characteristics. While evidence of the Strong Black Woman was robust in our sample, we also identified that women with a lived experience of chronic pain also submitted to God for strength and code-switched to counter the weaponization, misunderstanding, and implicit bias of being perceived as “strong” in healthcare encounters.

Research now and in the future must leverage the inner strength of the “sisterhood” and spirituality as cultural assets to empower Black communities to effectively manage chronic pain. We hope this work will lead to a greater appreciation of narrative inquiry of underrepresented individuals as rigorous scientific evidence that can lead to innovative and equitable health solutions that transform lives. “There is a kind of strength that is almost frightening in Black women. It’s as if a steel rod runs right through the head
down to the feet” (Dr. Maya Angelou).

HOPE Women’s Group (author Staja Booker in the green/blue sweater in the center)

Japan’s tragedy (or is it all of us??)


This just appeared out of nowhere just now and I had totally forgotten writing it – but it would have been so appropriate 2 years ago – not that it will not continue to be appropriate going forward because the earthquake/hurricane/tsunami is still ahead of us.

Peggy L Chinn

Yesterday Thomas Cox sent around a terrific commentary on what is happening in Japan, and with his permission, I am posting it here.  If you want to see the actual post on the Nurse-Philosophy list, go to this link: http://bit.ly/hUfKBM.

But this is so important, I am posting it here in its entirety:

Risk – The Real Butterfly Effect

by Thomas Cox, PhD, RN, author of  the soon to be available book: Standard Errors: Life, Health & Death When Hospitals, Long Term Care Facilities, Home Health Agencies, Physicians & Nurses Are Insurers.

I have resisted the impulse to comment on Japan. But there are only a few “Teachable moments” as profound as this one.

45+ years ago somebody thought it would be a great idea to build a nuclear reactor along the pacific ocean coastline in a country with high seismic activity and high risks of tsunamis.

That day, a butterfly emerged…

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