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The Patient Experience


The current featured article in ANS is titled “The Patient Care Experience as Perceived by Hispanic Patients With Chronic Illness Undergoing Transplant: A Grounded Theory” authored by Silvinia Gamilia González Cuizon, PhD, RN and Eileen K. Fry-Bowers, PhD, JD, RN, CPNP, FAAN. Download this article while it is featured at no cost, and share you comments related to the article here. Dr. Cuizon shared this background about the development of the theory for ANS readers:

In my time as a clinical nurse and through my interactions with patients, I developed an interest in the issues surrounding the patient experience. Cultivating a “good” experience from an unfortunate time was always important to me. Not many people want to be in the hospital, let alone be sick, so making the experience as “good” as possible mattered to me. Along the way, I also found my clinical practice was increasingly influenced by The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. This survey was developed to be an objective measurement of patient experience with the aspiration to gauge consumer perspectives about their hospital care.  While I do feel the patient experience matters, I did start to ask myself questions such as: Are we really capturing the patients’ needs? Is this truly a reflection of our care?  

As I transitioned into an administrative role, my perspective on the patient experience broadened to understand its hospital wide impact.  Quarterly, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Value Based Purchasing (HVBP) Program withholds 2% from this quality indicator domain. If a hospital performs at the national benchmark and or achievement threshold, they gain back the 2% withholdings. If a hospital does not meet the metric, they lose their 2% withholdings1. Additionally, coming from a safety-net hospital, I noted additional challenges in meeting such metrics.  Safety-net hospitals exist to deliver care to individuals who struggle with social determinants of health and live in less-than-ideal locations nationwide. The majority of these patients are uninsured or underinsured, battle more comorbidities, and have poorer health outcomes than their more affluent counterparts because of systemic health inequities plaguing this country2.  I began to ask myself: how do these fiscal implications impact safety-net hospitals? Do they exacerbate health inequities or do they improve them?

My Doctoral program gave me a platform to further discover the complexities of this multi-dimensional phenomena. My examination of existing literature demonstrated substantial evidence to support differences in the patient experience perspective among traditionally underserved populations, including racial and ethnic minorities. Historically, surveys such as HCAHPS were not developed with this particular group in mind.3  This was evidenced by the minority response rate reported in the HCAHPS three state pilot test guiding the development of the HCAHPS survey4.  This was the impetus for my dissertation research. 

 The findings reported in this article focus on the experience of Hispanic transplant patients receiving care at a safety-net healthcare system. The patient interviews allow for an in-depth understanding of their perception of a positive hospital experience.  Four major interdependent and co-occurring concepts were developed:

  • Comfort
  • Communication
  • Connection
  • Care

Ultimately, the study findings confirmed important attributes of a Hispanic patient’s experience, such as communication and care, already measured by the current HCAHPS survey. Additionally, factors such as connectedness and comfort were important and need to be further examined. This study highlights the role culture plays in interpretation of one’s experience as a patient.  Due to the evolving nature of culture and societal norms and the enormous role the patient experience plays in health care, further refinement of this concept can provide already socially marginalized populations, such as the Hispanic population, a voice and the positive health outcomes they deserve. It will also provide clinicians a better understanding of what constitutes an optimal patient experience. With such high stalks it is imperative we get it right.

References:

  1. CMS. (2021). CAHPS® Hospital Survey (HCAHPS) Quality Assurance Guidelines V16. 0.
  2. Kirch, D. G. (2016). In the Search for Measures that Matter, Star Ratings Miss the Mark. Retrieved from https://news.aamc.org/patient-care/article/search-measures-matter-star-ratings-miss-mark/
  3. Stewart, AL., Nápoles‐Springer A, Pérez‐Stable EJ. (1999). Interpersonal processes of care in diverse populations. The Milbank Quarterly, 77(3), 305-339.
  4. Medicare, C. f., Services, M. (2003). HCAHPS three-state pilot study analysis results. Baltimore, MD. Available online at                                                                                      http://www/.cms.hhs.gov/HospitalQualityInits/downloads/Hospital3State_Pilot_Analysis_Final200512. pdf.
One Comment Post a comment
  1. Doctor Silvi Cuizon is correct in her observations. I find it a riveting read and hope that medical entities across the whole United States will resolve to make positive changes that help improve the patient experience for all, specially minorities.

    December 15, 2022

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