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Posts from the ‘Journal Information’ Category

The Roy Adaptation Model to guide nursing practice


Karen Jennings, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC is the author of our current featured article titled “The Roy Adaptation Model: A Theoretical Framework for Nurses Providing Care to Individuals With Anorexia Nervosa.” Her article is available for download at no cost while it is featured – we invite you to read the article and return here to share your ideas, questions and comments!  Here is Karen, sharing more about her work.

Palliative Care Nursing: A Concept Analysis


The current featured ANS article is titled “A Concept Analysis of Palliative Care Nursing: Advancing Nursing Theory” by Amanda J. Kirkpatrick, MSN, RN-BC; Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Suzanne C. Smeltzer, EdD, RN, FAAN. The article is available for download at no cost while it is featured, and we welcome your comments about the article here!  Here is a message from Amanda Kirpatrick about her work:

When I first graduated with my BSN and began working as a nurse I quickly realized how unprepared I felt to deliver palliative care to seriously ill patients, and to handle patient issues surrounding the end of life. I am now an experienced nurse and nurse educator who teaches students about the importance of early referral to palliative care to ensure that patients receive the best symptom

Amanda J. Kirkpatrick

management and achieve the highest quality of life possible while managing a serious life-limiting illness. In support of this aim, and as part of my doctoral studies, I began researching how nurses attain competence in palliative care nursing. I discovered that there was a gap in the literature related to palliative care nursing theory, and determined that a concept analysis of palliative care nursing (using Walker and Avant’s methodology) was needed. I believed a concept analysis was the best way to identify the antecedents of palliative care nursing competence, as well as to clearly describe the nursing behaviors that demonstrate that palliative care nursing competence is achieved.

This concept analysis is very timely considering the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s (AACN) January 2016 release of 17 Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students (CARES) for Preparing Nurses to Care for the Seriously Ill and their Families. This concept analysis fills an international knowledge gap in the theoretical understanding of palliative care nursing, which currently limits the potential for nursing education and research in this area. Establishing a clear understanding of how palliative care nursing competence is developed and translates into practice holds value for nurses who implement this important care, nursing educators who must prepare these nurses to meet the AACN competencies, and researchers investigating palliative care nursing practice.

ANS Featured Topics


ANS continues the fine tradition of featuring topics of particular current interest, but we also include articles generally relevant to the purposes of the journal. The purposes of ANS are to advance the development of nursing knowledge and to promote the integration of nursing philosophies, theories and research with practice. We expect high scholarly merit and encourage innovative, cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.  We welcome submission of manuscripts consistent with these purposes at any time, but if your scholarship is related to any of the planned featured topics, note the due dates below, and the description of what we seek related to these topics!

Child and Adolescent Health
Vol 41:3 –   September 2018
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2018

The health of children and adolescents is crucial to the future well-being of all nations and the earth itself. Children are exposed to social, environmenal, technologic and political forces never before experienced, and nursing insights related to the health of children’s mind/body/soul are crucial. We are seeking manuscripts that provide innovative, cutting edge scholarship related nursing care of children and adolescents.  Articles are sought that provide research evidence related to nursing approaches to care, theoretical perspectives that inform nursing care, and articles that address philosophic, including ethical, perspectives that inform nursing care. ​​​​

Emancipatory Nursing
Vol 41:4 –  December 2018
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2018 

Emancipatory approaches to nursing research and practice have escalated in the context of major political and cultural upheavals worldwide. Emancipatory approaches include critical, feminist, poststructural and post colonial approaches, or any approach with an explicit purpose to create social and political change to improve health and well-being. For this issue we seek scholarship that informs emancipatory nursing practice and research. We welcome research reports that use emancipatory methodologies, emancipatory philosophic analyses, critical and feminist critiques of existing discourses and practices, description of and evidence supporting emancipatory nursing practices. ​

The Focus of the Discipline
Vol 42:1 –  March 2019
Manuscript due date: July 15, 2018 

Since the publication of the Newman, Sime and Corcoran-Perry article titled “The Focus on the Discipline of Nursing” in ANS in September, 1991, there has been growing discussion to clarify, amplify and explore not only the definition, but the implications of various interpretations of the focus of the discipline. Over these decades advances in other disciplines and the growing demand for interdisciplinary cooperation have influenced the discussion of nursing’s focus and where it fits int he interdisciplinary context. For this issue of ANS, we seek articles that advance these discussions. We welcome articles that reflect empirical or philosophic methodologies. Articles must address the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.

Culture, Race and Discrimination in Healthcare
Vol 42:2 –  June 2019
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2018 

In the past decade, issues of discrimination based on culture and race have risen to the surface in many countries worldwide, along with a growing nationalist movement that rejects “the other.”  In this issue of ANS we seek manuscripts that address these factors as they influence health and well-being of individuals, groups and communities, and the delivery of nursing and heatlhcare in culturally diverse communities.  Articles must address the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.

Critique and Innovation
Vol 42:3 –  September 2019
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2019 

Consistent with the journal’s tradition, we encourage nursing scholars to reflect on work previously published in ANS, and use critical insights to present innovations in nursing theory, research, practice and policy. We encourage cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.​

Artificial Intelligence & Robotics
Vol 42:4 –  December 2019
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2019

Artificial intelligence and robotics have been evolving in nursing for some time. We are planning to feature articles in this issue that address the relationship of artificial intelligence and robotics to patient outcomes and quality of care from a nursing perspective. We welcome philosophic analysis, including ethical implications, empiric research reports, and the development of innovative methodologies related to artificial intelligence. Articles must focus on the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.

Mixed Research Synthesis of Stress in Mothers of Preterm Infants


The current featured ANS article is titled “Posttraumatic Stress in Mothers While Their Preterm Infants Are in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit: A Mixed Research Synthesis” by Cheryl Tatano Beck, DNSc, CNM, FAAN and Jennifer Woynar, BSN, RN.  The article is available to download at no cost while it is featured on the ANS site!  Here are messages from each of the authors about their work:

Cheryl Beck:

In my qualitative program of research on traumatic childbirth, mothers have repeatedly shared how traumatic giving birth

Cheryl Tatano Beck

prematurely was. Their posttraumatic stress did not stop after giving birth but continued as their fragile infants were now in the NICU fighting for their lives.  I wanted to get a handle on just how pervasive mothers’ posttraumatic stress is while their infants are in the NICU. I decided to synthesize all the published literature I could locate- qualitative studies, quantitative studies, and mixed methods studies. In order to integrate these qualitative and quantitative findings in a single systematic review, I chose to do a mixed research synthesis. In the past I have published metasyntheses and meta-analyses but never a mixed research synthesis.  I wanted to try my hand at this type of literature review. Another reason I had for conducting this mixed research synthesis was that in teaching my PhD students I love to provide them with my own concrete examples of research that I have done to help them understand the various methods.  Over the semester I conducted this mixed research synthesis I was fortunate to have Jennifer Woynar, my wonderful co-author, as my graduate assistant. This opportunity provided Jen with hands on experience with doing this type of research synthesis which can enhance the breadth and depth of understanding complex problems or phenomena.

Jennifer Woynar

Jennifer Woynar:

As a first-year BSN-PhD student, I was excited to embark on this mixed research synthesis adventure with Dr. Beck. The connection between the qualitative and quantitative data provided me, as the reader, with both the emotional journey of mothers with preterm infants, as well as interventional studies to build on that data.  Rating the articles based on the CASP scores was engaging and I felt supported in discussing and resolving any incongruences with these ratings.  Overall this was a very meaningful experience and I hope that the reader enjoys this work.

 

Model of Parental Stress in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care


WE are currently featuring  the article titled “The Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Parental Stress Model: Refinement Using Directed Content Analysis” by Amy Jo Lisanti, PhD, RN, CCNS, CCRN-K; Nadya Golfenshtein, PhD, RN; and Barbara Medoff-Cooper, PhD, RN, FAAN. Download and read this article at no cost while it is featured, and return here to share your feedback, comments and ideas!  Dr. Lisanti sent this message about her work:

Amy Jo Lisanti

My research focuses on the stress of parents whose infants are born with congenital heart disease requiring surgery in the neonatal period.  The recent article published in ANS built upon my dissertation work on maternal stress in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit, where I used research instruments to quantitatively measure stress and anxiety. The study elucidated some of the relationships between maternal stress and anxiety in the critical care environment, but I was hungry to understand more.  I wanted to conduct another study to examine additional factors influencing the stress experience for mothers using the model I had created for my dissertation, the PCICU Parental Stress Model. The ANS publication represents the fruition of the work that I was able to complete under the leadership of my postdoctoral mentor, Dr. Barbara Medoff-Cooper, and with my colleague, Dr. Nadya Golfenshtein. We conducted focus groups with mothers and used directed content analysis to clarify specific foci of stress and to refine the PCICU Parental Stress Model. My goal is continue to use the model as a foundation for future research.  In my current postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, I am expanding my research on parental stress to include the use of biomarkers and to begin to test interventions to reduce parental stress in this population.

ANS 40:4 just released; new featured topics announced!


The latest issue of ANS has just been released, bringing to a close the end of our 40th anniversary year!  See the Table of Contents here and watch for each article to be featured over the next 3 months!  Featured articles are available for download at no cost on the ANS website while they are featured, and we post a message about each article and the authors on this blog!

Each future issue of ANS will continue to feature articles on a specific topic – a tradition that has called forth cutting-edge scholarship in nursing that has made a lasting influence on the discipline. Each issue will also include articles generally related to the purposes and scope of ANS.  You are not limited to our featured topics, and if your work on a featured topic does not come to fruition in line with our “due dates” – never fear!  We welcome all manuscripts that are consistent with our purposes any time!  Here is specific information about how this works:

General Topic Manuscripts welcome any time

Manuscripts generally relevant to the purposes of the journal are welcome at any time. The purposes of ANS are to advance the development of nursing knowledge and to promote the integration of nursing philosophies, theories and research with practice. We expect high scholarly merit and encourage innovative, cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.

Child and Adolescent Health
Vol 41:3 – September 2018
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2018
The health of children and adolescents is crucial to the future well-being of all nations and the earth itself. Children are exposed to social, environmenal, technologic and political forces never before experienced, and nursing insights related to the health of children’s mind/body/soul are crucial. We are seeking manuscripts that provide innovative, cutting edge scholarship related nursing care of children and adolescents. Articles are sought that provide research evidence related to nursing approaches to care, theoretical perspectives that inform nursing care, and articles that address philosophic, including ethical, perspectives that inform nursing care. ​​​​

Emancipatory Nursing
Vol 41:4 – December 2018
Manuscript due date: April 15, 2018
Emancipatory approaches to nursing research and practice have escalated in the context of major political and cultural upheavals worldwide. Emancipatory approaches include critical, feminist, poststructural and post colonial approaches, or any aproach with an explicite purpose to create social and political change to improve health and well-being. For this issue we seek scholarship that informs emancipatory nursing practice and research. We welcome research reports that use emancipatory methodologies, emancipatory philosophic analyses, critical and feminist critiques of existing discourses and practices, description of and evidence supporting emancipatory nursing practices. ​

The Focus of the Discipline
Vol 42:1 – March 2019
Manuscript due date: July 15, 2018
Since the publication of the Newman, Sime and Corcoran-Perry article titled “The Focus on the Discipline of Nursing” in ANS in September, 1991, there has been growing discussion to clarify, amplify and explore not only the definition, but the implications of various interpretations of the focus of the discipline. Over these decades advances in other disciplines and the growing demand for interdisciplinary cooperation have influenced the discussion of nursing’s focus and where it fits int he interdisciplinary context. For this issue of ANS, we seek articles that advance these discussions. We welcome articles that reflect empirical or philosophic methodologies. Articles must address the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.

Culture, Race and Discrimination in Healthcare
Vol 42:2 – June 2019
Manuscript due date: October 15, 2018
In the past decade, issues of discrimination based on culture and race have risen to the surface in many countries worldwide, along with a growing nationalist movement that rejects “the other.” In this issue of ANS we seek manuscripts that address these factors as they influence health and well-being of individuals, groups and communities, and the delivery of nursing and heatlhcare in culturally diverse communities. Articles must address the development of nursing knowledge that informs nursing practice, education and research.

Critique and Innovation
Vol 42:3 – September 2019
Manuscript due date: January 15, 2019
Consistent with the journal’s tradition, we encourage nursing scholars to reflect on work previously published in ANS, and use critical insights to present innovations in nursing theory, research, practice and policy. We encourage cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health.​

Description, Critical Reflection and Evaluation of Transitions Theory


The current featured article is by Katja Bohner, MNSc, of Switzerland, titled  “Theory Description, Critical Reflection, and Theory Evaluation of the Transitions Theory of Meleis et al according to Chinn and Kramer (2011).” The article is available to download at no cost while it is featured, and we welcome your comments and questions here!  This is a message that Ms. Bohner sent for ANS blog

Katja Bohner

readers:

The future will ask: What did you do?

I am very glad that I have the opportunity to share some of my thoughts about my latest work.

If the future would ask me today: What did you do? I would first say in regard to this work that even though I experienced mixed feelings (e.g. excitement or insecurity) all the way long, I continued doing this work. And even though it felt “risky,” venturing into the unknown with the inherent surprises and new insights, I always felt that WHAT I am doing is worth the  effort. So, what I have learned again in this (working) process, is that finally it is about values that guide the process of navigating through the uncharted terrain of life in general and making transitions. For me, more than ever, values are what make us human beings and acting a life worth living.  So I hope that my work inspires readers to go on sharing their values by acting according to them.

 

What is “patient turnover?”


The current featured ANS article is titled “Patient Turnover: A Concept Analysis” by Christopher A. VanFosson, MSN/MHA, RN; Linda H. Yoder, PhD, MBA, RN, AOCN, FAAN; and Terry L. Jones, PhD, RN. This may seem like a simple concept, but as these authors show, it is far more complex, and interrelated with other quality of care issues, than is apparent on the surface.  The article is available at no cost on the ANS website – download it and return here – we welcome your comments. Lieutenant Colonel VanFosson shared this message about his work:

The study I conducted for my doctoral dissertation was aimed at describing the patterns and prevalence of unfinished nursing care at the US Army Burn Center, as well as identifying aspects of the nursing work environment that significantly influenced nurse estimates of unfinished nursing care. Unfinished nursing care is a product of time scarcity; when nurses do not have enough time to

Christopher VanFosson

complete all of the elements of care for their patients, some elements may be left unfinished.

A review of the literature about unfinished nursing care (also known as missed care, tasks undone, or implicitly rationed care) revealed that patient turnover was a potential antecedent of unfinished nursing care. The concept of patient turnover is one with which every hospital nurse is familiar. Every hospital nurse admits, transfers, or discharges patients from their unit. Often, nurses experience this multiple times on their shift. Understanding the experience of patient turnover is almost intuitive for the hospital nurse. However, for me as a novice scientist, discussions about the influence of patient turnover on other phenomena (such as unfinished nursing care) were incomplete because the antecedents, defining attributes, and consequences of patient turnover were not well defined in the literature. Therefore, under the guidance of my dissertation co-chairs (and co-authors of this paper), Dr. Linda H. Yoder and Dr. Terry L. Jones, I undertook an analysis of patient turnover so that I could clearly operationalize the concept for my study.

My next step is to publish the findings of my dissertation research. In the future, I intend to expand my study to other nursing units in the burn and/or military nursing environments. This concept analysis will be the basis on which I operationalize patient turnover in these future studies.

Cross-cultural Research: Lessons Learned


For the next couple of weeks we are featuring the article titled “Practical Issues of Conducting a Q Methodology Study: Lessons Learned From a Cross-cultural Study” by Teresa Elizabeth Stone, PhD; Jane Maguire, PhD; Sook Jung Kang, PhD, FNP-C; and Chiyoung Cha, PhD, RN. The

researchers are from Australia and South Korea. Their research focuses on differing health beliefs among nurses. We invite you to obtain your copy of this article while it is featured, and return here to share your comments!  Here is a message from the authors:

In this paper, we address the methodological issues of conducting a Q method study in cross cultural research settings. Four researchers from Australia and South Korea conducted a pilot study using Q methodology design in Japan and South Korea to learn about nurses’ health beliefs. During the research process, we encountered methodological issues and cross-cultural issues which we would like to share with other researchers who may be planning to conduct a Q methodology study. Despite its infrequent use in nursing, Q methodology can yield rich information about differing perspectives. This information might be difficult to uncover using conventional research approaches. The findings of the pilot study are presented in Nurse Education Today.

 The learning from our initial research in Japan and Korea as described in ‘Practical issues of conducting a Q methodology study’ was used in a recently completed five country study The aim of this study was to provide understanding of health belief content, origin, socio-cultural and other influencing factors held by clinical nurses and nursing academics in Japan, Australia, China, South Korea, and Thailand, and its impact on their nursing practice and education. We are looking forward to publishing these fascinating results in the near future.

Community-engaged Research: Working Effectively Across Diverse Communities


Our current featured article is titled “Advancing Nursing Science Through Community Advisory Boards: Working Effectively Across Diverse Communities” by Rosa M. Gonzalez-Guarda, PhD, MPH, CPH, RN, FAAN; Emily J. Jones, PhD, RNC-OB; Elizabeth Cohn, PhD, boardRN; Gordon L. Gillespie, PhD, DNP, RN, CEN, CNE, CPEN, PHCNS-BC, FAEN, FAAN; and Felesia Bowen, PhD, DNP, APN.  While this article is featured, you can download it at no cost here.  We welcome your comments and ideas!

Abstract:

The movement toward community-engaged research is well aligned with nursing’s strong tradition of engaging individuals, families, and communities in designing and evaluating nursing care. As such, nurse scientists should consider engaging the recipients of care in the research process. Community advisory boards are a common way in which communities are engaged in research. The purpose of this article is to provide a framework for effectively working with community advisory boards in diverse communities that is informed by evidence and experiences of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars. Recommendations can serve as a blueprint for nurse scientists as they engage communities in research promoting health equity.

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